For Your Child

Monthly articles designed to help you acheive your best health ever.

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We all feel stress. And children aren’t immune to the pressure. They may struggle with school, sports, and other daily demands. A recent national survey shows stress can be especially troubling for teenagers.
Parents need to be up-to-speed on the best tactics for preventing SIDS. Unfortunately, a recent study shows many may not be doing all they can.
More American children are feeling the itch of eczema. One out of 10 currently suffers from this chronic skin condition. If your child is one of them, take note. That red, inflamed skin may last well into adulthood. Even so, a healthy skin strategy can help soothe your child’s symptoms.
Staying up late and sleeping in. Biologically, your teen’s brain may be programmed to such a sleep cycle. Only it isn’t helping him or her secure needed shuteye. In fact, more teens today are skimping on sleep, says a recent study.
If the warmer weather has your child itching to pitch, don’t let him or her overdue it. A recent survey of young ball players found many of them play with arm pain. That can be a sign of an overuse injury. As a parent, you can help prevent this sports-related problem.
Children with asthma or a food allergy may find school a challenge. A sudden asthma attack or allergic reaction can quickly turn into an emergency. Unfortunately, not all students with these conditions have a care plan in place to help deal with such a situation.
Being bullied isn’t something most children want to talk about. Yet, 1 out of 4 children report such peer abuse. The immediate result is low self-esteem and depression. These negative health effects and others may even linger into adulthood.
You can’t protect your child from every cut, scrape, or bruise. Such injuries are virtually a rite of childhood. You can take precautions to make your home a safer place, though. Here are 4 household hazards you may have never considered.
Your car can be a dangerous place for your child. More children die from motor vehicle accidents than from any other type of mishap. The latest statistics show such incidents are declining. But many more could be prevented with proper safety restraints.
One hour a day. That’s all it takes for your child to meet the national physical activity guidelines. Unfortunately, a recent government report found too few U.S. children are reaching that goal.
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